Tag Archives: nutrition education

Say No to Takis! Fifth Graders Work to Make Their School a Healthier Place

Written by: Elizabeth Esparza, FoodCorps Service Member with Pittsburg Unified School District 

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Fifth graders at Willow Cove Elementary in Pittsburg, CA make an alternative snack to Takis. The secret recipe, you ask? It’s just lime, cayenne, and freshly cut jicama.

Fifth graders at Willow Cove Elementary in Pittsburg are on a mission to make their school Takis free. Takis are a popular spicy rolled tortilla chip snack, similar to Hot Cheetos in spice and unhealthiness. For a project in class, students began to do some research on the unhealthy and potentially harmful ingredients present in the snack and found that they just could not keep the knowledge to themselves. Continue reading

Finding Health in School Farms and Gardens in Ventura

Chris_Massa-2After FoodCorps Service Member, Chris Massa, served 1.5 years with Ventura Unified School District in southern California. After starting a student farm with the district, Chris has moved on from his service and is now the Farm to School Operations Specialist with Ventura Unified. Read on to see Chris’s findings and the importance of student-based farms.

“Is this seed really going to grow?”

This is a persistent question I encounter while learning in the garden with students from Ventura Unified School District. “If we provide it with all the necessary elements, air, sun, water, and soil, it surely will,” I reply.

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Farm to la Escuela: Nutrition Education with English Language Learners

Sarah_MendesThis week’s blogpost highlight is written by FoodCorps Service Member Sara Mendes who is currently serving with Life Lab and Community Alliance with Family Farmers (CAFF) along the Central Coast. Serving in the heartland of agriculture and in Spanish-speaking communities, Sara has been able to serve countless of students by teaching Harvest of the Month lessons and leading field trips. Read on to learn about her approach to teaching bilingual garden and nutrition-based lessons.

“¿Como se dice ‘sour’ en español?” I ask my first grade students. “Amargo!” someone shouts. “No! That means bitter. Agrio!” another voice suggests.

Agrio,” the class agrees. I write the word in English and Spanish on the whiteboard where we are very scientifically documenting how two varieties of local kiwi taste.

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